Duties and Tariffs, Why You Should Know About Duties & Tariffs

Duties and Tariffs, Why You Should Know About Duties & Tariffs

7 Reasons Why You Should Know About Duties and Tariffs


Duties and tariffs are two types of taxes that affect international trade. They are often used interchangeably, but they have different meanings and implications. In this article, we will explain what duties and tariffs are, how they are calculated, and why they are important for businesses and consumers.


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What are Duties?


Duties are taxes that governments impose on imported or exported goods. They are also known as customs duties or import duties. Duties are usually a fixed percentage of the goods’ value, and they vary depending on the type of goods and the country of origin or destination. For example, the United States charges a 2.5% duty on imported cars, but a 25% duty on imported trucks.

The main purposes of duties are to raise government revenue and to protect domestic industries from foreign competition. By making imported goods more expensive, duties encourage consumers to buy local products instead. Duties also help to regulate the quality and safety of imported goods, as they can be used to enforce standards and regulations.

What are Tariffs?


Tariffs are taxes that governments impose specifically on imported goods. They are also known as import tariffs or customs tariffs. Tariffs are either a fixed amount per unit of goods or a percentage of the goods’ value. For example, the United States charges a $0.15 tariff per kilogram of imported sugar, or a 15% tariff on imported steel.

The main purpose of tariffs is to limit imports and protect domestic industries from foreign competition. By making imported goods more expensive, tariffs reduce the demand for them and increase the demand for domestic products. Tariffs also help to balance trade deficits and to retaliate against unfair trade practices by other countries.

Why are Duties and Tariffs Important?


Duties and tariffs are important for both businesses and consumers, as they affect the prices, availability, and quality of goods in the market. Here are some reasons why you should know about duties and tariffs:

  • They can increase your costs: If you are importing or exporting goods, you have to pay duties and tariffs to the customs authorities. These taxes can add up to a significant amount, especially if you are dealing with high-value or high-volume goods. You have to factor in these costs when setting your prices and budgets.
  • They can affect your competitiveness: If you are competing with foreign or domestic producers, you have to consider how duties and tariffs affect your relative prices and profits. If your competitors have lower or no duties and tariffs on their products, they may have an advantage over you in terms of price or quality. You have to find ways to differentiate your products or services from theirs.
  • They can change over time: Duties and tariffs are not fixed or permanent. They can change depending on the political and economic situation of the countries involved. For example, in 2018, the United States imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from several countries, triggering a trade war that resulted in retaliatory tariffs from other countries. You have to keep track of these changes and adjust your strategies accordingly.
  • They can create opportunities: Duties and tariffs can also create opportunities for businesses and consumers. For example, if you are producing goods that have lower or no duties and tariffs in your target market, you may have an opportunity to expand your sales and market share. Alternatively, if you are buying goods that have lower or no duties and tariffs in your source market, you may have an opportunity to save money and get better quality products.

How to Learn More About Duties and Tariffs?


If you want to learn more about duties and tariffs, here are some resources that you can use:

  • The World Trade Organization (WTO) website: The WTO is an international organization that regulates trade among its member countries. It provides information on the rules, agreements, disputes, statistics, and news related to trade issues, including duties and tariffs.
  • The World Customs Organization (WCO) website: The WCO is an international organization that promotes cooperation among customs authorities around the world. It provides information on the standards, conventions, instruments, tools, and best practices related to customs matters, including duties and tariffs.
  • The International Trade Administration (ITA) website: The ITA is a part of the U.S. Department of Commerce that promotes trade and investment between the United States and other countries. It provides information on the policies, programs, services, data, and events related to trade issues, including duties and tariffs.
  • The Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) website: The HTS is a system that classifies all goods that are traded internationally according to a common code. It provides information on the duty rates and tariff preferences for each product category for every country in the world.


Duties and tariffs are two types of taxes that affect international trade. They have different meanings and implications for businesses and consumers. By knowing what duties and tariffs are, how they are calculated, and why they are important, you can make better decisions and take advantage of the opportunities that they create.

The impact of duties and tariffs on global demand

Duties and tariffs are taxes imposed by governments on imported goods. They are usually intended to protect domestic industries from foreign competition, raise revenue, or achieve some political or strategic goals. However, in a world of global value chains, where production is fragmented across countries and regions, raising tariffs can have significant negative repercussions on economic activity.


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How duties and tariffs affect global demand

One way to measure the effect of duties and tariffs on global demand is to look at the nominal and effective rates of protection. The nominal rate of protection is the percentage tariff imposed on a product as it enters the country. The effective rate of protection is the ratio of the value added by domestic producers with and without tariff protection. The value added is the difference between the price of the product and the cost of the imported inputs used to produce it.

For example, suppose a country imports clothing for $100 and fabric for $60 on international markets. Without tariffs, a domestic clothing manufacturer can add a maximum of $40 for labour, profit, and other costs. If the country imposes a 20% tariff on clothing and a 10% tariff on fabric, the domestic price of clothing will rise to $120, while the cost of fabric will increase to $66. The domestic producer can now add $54 for value added, which is $14 more than before. The effective rate of protection is 35%, which is higher than the nominal rate of 20%.

The effective rate of protection depends on the tariff rates on both the final product and the inputs, as well as the share of inputs in the total cost of production. In general, global sourcing by firms implies that higher tariffs, usually imposed to protect a domestic industry, can lead to higher input costs for domestic producers. This can reduce their competitiveness and profitability, lower their output and employment, and increase their prices for consumers.

How duties and tariffs affect global demand in different industries

The impact of duties and tariffs on global demand can vary across different industries, depending on their degree of integration in global value chains, their price elasticity of demand, and their substitutability with domestic or other foreign products.

For example, according to the World Trade Organization (WTO), tariffs on non-agricultural products are generally lower than those on agricultural products in developed countries. However, non-agricultural products tend to have higher shares of imported inputs in their production processes, which means that they are more exposed to the negative effects of tariff hikes on input costs. On the other hand, agricultural products tend to have lower shares of imported inputs, but higher price elasticities of demand, which means that they are more sensitive to changes in consumer preferences and incomes.

Another example is the difference between intermediate and final goods. Intermediate goods are products that are used as inputs in the production of other goods, such as raw materials, components, or services. Final goods are products that are sold directly to consumers or end-users, such as cars, clothing, or food. According to the European Central Bank (ECB), intermediate goods account for about two-thirds of world trade in goods, while final goods account for about one-third. Intermediate goods tend to have lower tariffs than final goods, but they also have higher trade volumes and higher shares of imported inputs. Therefore, raising tariffs on intermediate goods can have larger negative effects on global demand than raising tariffs on final goods.

References:

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/6958854.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20120915114121/http://siteresources.worldbank.org/AFRICAEXT/Resources/AFR_Growth_Advance_Edition.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20210308192131/https://www.cepal.org/prensa/noticias/comunicados/8/7598/chang.pdf

https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tariffs_e/tariff_data_e.htm

https://www.britannica.com/money/topic/international-trade/Measuring-the-effects-of-tariffs

https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/duty-vs-tariff-what-s-the-difference/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tariff

https://traderiskguaranty.com/trgpeak/difference-taxes-duties-tariffs/

https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/duty-vs-tariff/



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