Quinoa Production by Country, How Affects the Global Market

Quinoa Production by Country, How Affects the Global Market

How Quinoa Production by Country Affects the Global Market

Quinoa is a grain crop that has been cultivated in South America for thousands of years. It is considered a superfood because of its high nutritional value and health benefits. Quinoa is rich in protein, fiber, minerals, antioxidants and essential amino acids. It is also gluten-free and suitable for vegan and vegetarian diets.


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Quinoa production has increased significantly in the last decade, as the global demand for this crop has grown. According to Statista, the global quinoa production volume was about 163 thousand metric tons in 2021, up from 92 thousand metric tons in 2010. The global quinoa market value was estimated at 1.1 billion U.S. dollars in 2020, and is projected to reach 1.9 billion U.S. dollars by 2026.

The main quinoa producing countries are Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador, which account for over 97% of the global production share. Peru is the largest producer, with over 86 thousand metric tons in 2021, followed by Bolivia with about 39 thousand metric tons and Ecuador with about 2 thousand metric tons. These countries have a long tradition of growing quinoa, as well as favorable climatic and soil conditions for this crop.

However, quinoa production is not limited to South America. Other countries have also started to cultivate quinoa, such as Chile, Colombia, the United States, Canada, Australia, China, India and some European countries. These countries aim to diversify their agricultural production, meet the domestic demand for quinoa and enter the international market.

Quinoa production by country affects the global market in several ways. In this blog post, we will explore how quinoa production by country influences the following aspects:

  • Supply and price of quinoa
  • Quality and diversity of quinoa
  • Social and environmental impacts of quinoa production

Supply and price of quinoa

One of the main effects of quinoa production by country is that it influences the supply and price of quinoa in the global market. As more countries produce quinoa, the supply increases and the price decreases, making quinoa more accessible and affordable for consumers.

This can be seen in the trend of the average global price of quinoa, which has declined from about 6.8 U.S. dollars per kilogram in 2014 to about 3.2 U.S. dollars per kilogram in 2021. This reflects the increase in quinoa production worldwide, which has exceeded the growth in demand.

However, this also poses a challenge for the traditional quinoa producers in South America, who may face lower profits and increased competition from other countries. The lower price of quinoa may affect their income and livelihoods, especially if they depend on quinoa as their main source of revenue.

Moreover, the lower price of quinoa may also affect the quality and sustainability of quinoa production, as some producers may resort to using cheaper inputs or methods that may harm the environment or reduce the nutritional value of quinoa.

Therefore, quinoa production by country should be done in a fair and equitable way, ensuring that the benefits are shared among all stakeholders involved in the value chain, from farmers to consumers.

Quality and diversity of quinoa

Another effect of quinoa production by country is that it affects the quality and diversity of quinoa available in the global market. Different countries may grow different varieties of quinoa, which have different characteristics such as color, shape, size, flavor and nutritional content. Some varieties may be more adapted to certain environments or preferences than others.

For example, some varieties of quinoa are more resistant to drought or frost than others, which makes them suitable for growing in harsher climates or seasons. Some varieties of quinoa have a higher protein or iron content than others, which makes them more nutritious or beneficial for certain health conditions. Some varieties of quinoa have a sweeter or nuttier flavor than others, which makes them more appealing or versatile for cooking or eating.

Therefore, quinoa production by country may offer more options and variety for consumers who want to enjoy different types of quinoa according to their needs or tastes.

However, this also requires more quality control and standardization to ensure that the consumers get what they expect when they buy or consume quinoa. For instance, some consumers may prefer organic or fair trade certified quinoa over conventional or uncertified ones. Some consumers may want to know the origin or traceability of their quinoa products. Some consumers may have specific dietary requirements or allergies that need to be considered when buying or consuming quinoa.

Therefore, quinoa production by country should follow clear and consistent guidelines and regulations to ensure that the quality and safety of quinoa products are maintained and verified across different markets.

Social and environmental impacts of quinoa production

A third effect of quinoa production by country is that it impacts the social and environmental aspects of quinoa production. Quinoa production by country may generate income and employment opportunities for farmers and rural communities, especially in developing countries where quinoa is a traditional crop. Quinoa production may also contribute to food security and nutrition, as quinoa is a highly nutritious and versatile food that can be consumed in various ways.

However, quinoa production by country may also entail some negative effects such as land degradation, water scarcity, biodiversity loss and cultural erosion. These effects may occur due to the expansion of quinoa cultivation into new areas, the intensification of quinoa production using unsustainable practices, the displacement of other crops or activities by quinoa, or the loss of traditional knowledge or values associated with quinoa.

Therefore, quinoa production by country should be done in a sustainable and responsible way, respecting the rights and interests of the local producers and consumers, as well as the natural resources and ecosystems that support quinoa production.

Quinoa is a valuable crop that has a lot to offer to the global market. Quinoa production by country reflects the growing interest and demand for this crop around the world. However, it also poses some challenges and risks that need to be addressed. Quinoa production by country should aim to balance the economic, social and environmental aspects of this activity, ensuring that quinoa remains a source of nutrition, health and well-being for all.

Quinoa Production by Country: Trends and Challenges

Quinoa is a highly nutritious and versatile crop that has been cultivated in South America for thousands of years. It is considered a superfood because of its high protein, fiber, mineral and antioxidant content. Quinoa is also gluten-free and can adapt to different climatic conditions, making it a valuable food source for many people around the world.


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However, quinoa production faces several challenges, such as climate change, pests, diseases, market fluctuations and socio-economic factors. In this blog post, we will explore the trends and challenges of quinoa production by country, based on the latest statistics and reports.

Peru: The Largest Quinoa Producer in the World

According to Statista, Peru accounted for over 57% of the global production volume of quinoa in 2020, with about 86,011 tons. Peru has a long history and tradition of quinoa cultivation, especially in the Andean regions of Puno, Cusco, Ayacucho and Arequipa. Quinoa is an important staple food for many rural communities in Peru, as well as a source of income and export.

However, Peru also faces some challenges in quinoa production, such as the loss of genetic diversity due to monocropping, the competition with other crops such as potatoes and corn, the lack of technical assistance and infrastructure for small farmers, the environmental impacts of intensive farming practices and the vulnerability to climate change.

Bolivia: The Second Largest Quinoa Producer in the World

Bolivia was the largest quinoa producer in the world until 2014, when Peru surpassed it. In 2020, Bolivia accounted for about 40% of the global production volume of quinoa, with about 70,763 tons . Bolivia is the main exporter of organic quinoa, which has a higher price and demand in international markets. Bolivia produces mainly white quinoa, which is preferred by consumers for its mild flavor and fluffy texture.

However, Bolivia also faces some challenges in quinoa production, such as the decline in domestic consumption due to the high export prices, the social conflicts and land disputes among quinoa farmers and other sectors, the lack of quality standards and certification systems, the threat of pests and diseases such as mildew and weevils and the effects of climate change.

Ecuador: A Small but Growing Quinoa Producer

Ecuador is a small but growing quinoa producer in South America. In 2020, Ecuador accounted for about 2% of the global production volume of quinoa, with about 2,146 tons . Ecuador produces mainly red and black quinoa varieties, which have a higher nutritional value and antioxidant activity than white quinoa. Ecuador also has a diverse agroecological potential for quinoa cultivation, ranging from coastal to highland areas.

However, Ecuador also faces some challenges in quinoa production, such as the low productivity and profitability of small-scale farmers, the lack of access to credit and markets, the limited research and development on quinoa agronomy and processing, the competition with imported quinoa from Peru and Bolivia and the impact of climate change.

Quinoa is a remarkable crop that offers many benefits for human health and food security. However, quinoa production also faces many challenges that need to be addressed by governments, researchers, farmers and consumers. Some of these challenges include improving genetic diversity and seed quality, enhancing productivity and sustainability, promoting domestic consumption and value addition, strengthening market linkages and certification systems and adapting to climate change.

References:

https://futatraw.ourproject.org/descargas/DicQuechuaBolivia.pdf

https://www.fao.org/docrep/017/aq287e/aq287e.pdf

http://lasa.international.pitt.edu/members/congress-papers/lasa2009/files/KolataAlanL.pdf

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1128481/global-quinoa-production-share-by-country/
https://www.statista.com/statistics/486460/global-quinoa-production-by-country/
https://www.bioecoactual.com/en/2021/04/27/organic-quinoa-global-emerging-growing-market/
https://www.fao.org/3/a-i4042e.pdf
https://www.fao.org/quinoa-2013/what-is-quinoa/distribution-and-production/en/



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