sole proprietor vs s corp,7 Reasons to Choose

sole proprietor vs s corp,7 Reasons to Choose

7 Reasons to Choose S Corp Over Sole Proprietorship for Your Business

If you are starting a business by yourself, you may be wondering whether you should operate as a sole proprietorship or form an S corporation. Both options have advantages and disadvantages, but in this article, we will show you why an S corp may be a better choice for your business.

A sole proprietorship is an unincorporated business that is not legally separated from its owner. This means that you have full control over your business, but also full responsibility for its debts and liabilities. A sole proprietorship is easy to start and has lower tax deductions, but it also exposes your personal assets to potential lawsuits and creditors.

An S corporation is a corporation that elects to be taxed as a pass-through entity. This means that the income and losses of the corporation are passed through to its shareholders, who report them on their personal tax returns. An S corporation has limited liability protection and can avoid self-employment taxes, but it also has more regulations and record keeping requirements.

Here are seven reasons why you may want to choose an S corp over a sole proprietorship for your business:

1. Limited liability protection

One of the main benefits of an S corp is that it provides limited liability protection for its shareholders. This means that if your business is sued or goes bankrupt, your personal assets are generally not at risk. However, you may still be liable for your own negligence or misconduct, or if you personally guarantee any business debts. Therefore, it is advisable to have liability insurance as well.


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2. Tax savings

Another benefit of an S corp is that it can help you save on taxes. Unlike a sole proprietorship, an S corp does not have to pay self-employment taxes on its income. Self-employment taxes are composed of Social Security and Medicare taxes, which amount to 15.3% of your net earnings. As an S corp shareholder, you can pay yourself a reasonable salary and take the rest of the income as dividends, which are not subject to self-employment taxes. However, you still have to pay income taxes on both your salary and dividends.

3. Tax options

An S corp also gives you more tax options than a sole proprietorship. For example, you can choose your fiscal year-end, which may allow you to defer some of your income to a lower tax bracket. You can also deduct certain expenses that are not allowed for a sole proprietorship, such as health insurance premiums and retirement plan contributions for yourself and your employees.

4. Credibility and professionalism

Forming an S corp can also enhance the credibility and professionalism of your business. Having a corporate name and structure can make your business look more established and trustworthy to potential customers, suppliers, investors, and lenders. It can also help you separate your personal and business finances, which can make accounting and bookkeeping easier.

5. Growth potential

Another advantage of an S corp is that it has more growth potential than a sole proprietorship. An S corp can raise capital by issuing stock or borrowing money from banks or other sources. It can also attract and retain qualified employees by offering them stock options or other benefits. An S corp can also sell or transfer its shares to other shareholders, which can facilitate succession planning or exit strategies.

6. Perpetual existence

Unlike a sole proprietorship, which ends when the owner dies or quits the business, an S corp has perpetual existence. This means that the corporation continues to exist even if the shareholders change or leave the business. This can provide continuity and stability for the business and its customers and employees.

7. Legal compliance

Finally, forming an S corp can help you comply with the legal requirements of your state and industry. Depending on your type of business and location, you may need to obtain certain licenses, permits, registrations, or certifications to operate legally. Some of these may require you to have a corporate entity or a registered agent in your state. By forming an S corp, you can meet these requirements and avoid potential fines or penalties.

As you can see, there are many reasons why an S corp may be a better option than a sole proprietorship for your business. However, before you make a decision, you should consult with a tax professional and a legal expert to evaluate your specific situation and goals.

 


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Sole Proprietorship vs S Corporation: A Global Comparison

One of the most important decisions that a business owner has to make is what type of business structure to choose. Different structures have different advantages and disadvantages in terms of liability, taxation, and ease of formation. In this blog post, we will compare two common types of business structures: sole proprietorship and S corporation, and how they differ in various countries around the world.

Sole proprietorship is the simplest and most common form of business organization. It is a business owned and operated by one person, who is responsible for all the profits, losses, debts, and obligations of the business. The sole proprietor does not have to register the business with the state or pay any fees to start the business. However, the sole proprietor also does not have any limited liability protection, which means that the personal assets of the owner can be seized to pay off the business debts. The sole proprietor also has to pay self-employment taxes on the entire income of the business.

S corporation is a special type of corporation that elects to be taxed as a pass-through entity. This means that the income and losses of the corporation are passed through to the shareholders, who report them on their personal tax returns. The S corporation does not pay any corporate income tax, which avoids double taxation. The S corporation also provides limited liability protection to its shareholders, who are not personally liable for the debts and obligations of the corporation. However, the S corporation has to meet certain requirements to qualify for this tax status, such as having no more than 100 shareholders, being a domestic corporation, and having only one class of stock.

The advantages and disadvantages of sole proprietorship and S corporation vary depending on the country where the business operates. Here are some examples:

– In the United States, sole proprietorships are easy to start and operate, but they expose the owner to unlimited liability and high self-employment taxes. S corporations are more complex and costly to form and maintain, but they offer limited liability protection and lower taxes for qualified businesses.
– In Canada, sole proprietorships are also simple and inexpensive to set up, but they subject the owner to unlimited liability and high income taxes. S corporations do not exist in Canada, but there are similar entities called Canadian-controlled private corporations (CCPCs), which offer limited liability protection and lower taxes for eligible businesses.
– In the United Kingdom, sole proprietorships are also known as sole traders, and they have similar benefits and drawbacks as in other countries. S corporations do not exist in the UK, but there are similar entities called private limited companies (LTDs), which offer limited liability protection and lower taxes for small businesses.
– In Australia, sole proprietorships are also easy to start and run, but they expose the owner to unlimited liability and high income taxes. S corporations do not exist in Australia, but there are similar entities called proprietary limited companies (PTY LTDs), which offer limited liability protection and lower taxes for small businesses.

As you can see, sole proprietorship and S corporation are two common types of business structures that have different pros and cons depending on where you operate your business. If you are planning to start or expand your business globally, you should consult with a professional accountant or lawyer to determine which structure is best suited for your needs.

References:

http://www.lawnet.sabah.gov.my/Lawnet/SabahLawsDeclaredFederal/TradesLicensingOrdinance(SabahCap144).pdf

https://www.ssm.com.my/sites/default/files/guidelines/OWNER%20RESPONSIBILITY_new.pdf

https://www.thebalancemoney.com/sole-proprietorship-vs-s-corporation-pros-and-cons-4685986
https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikekappel/2021/04/28/business-structures-101-which-ones-the-best-fit-for-your-company/
https://beforetax.co/s-corp-vs-sole-proprietorship/
https://howtostartanllc.com/form-an-llc/sole-proprietorship-vs-s-corp
https://www.govdocfiling.com/blog/sole-proprietor-vs-SCorporation

https://howtostartanllc.com/form-an-llc/sole-proprietorship-vs-s-corp
https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/s-corporations-vs-sole-proprietorships.html
https://www.govdocfiling.com/blog/sole-proprietor-vs-SCorporation

 

 


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