various types of entrepreneurs,7 Types

various types of entrepreneurs,7 Types

7 Types of Entrepreneurs You Need to Know About

Entrepreneurship is a broad term that encompasses many different ways of creating and running a business. However, not all entrepreneurs are the same. Depending on their goals, motivations, skills, and strategies, entrepreneurs can be classified into different types. In this article, we will explore seven types of entrepreneurs you need to know about, and how they differ from each other.

1. Lifestyle Entrepreneurs

Lifestyle entrepreneurs are those who start a business to support their desired lifestyle, rather than to maximize profits or growth. They value flexibility, freedom, and personal fulfillment over money and status. Lifestyle entrepreneurs often choose businesses that align with their passions, hobbies, or interests, such as travel, fitness, art, or music. They may also opt for businesses that allow them to work remotely, set their own hours, or have more control over their work environment.

Some examples of lifestyle entrepreneurs are bloggers, podcasters, coaches, consultants, freelancers, and digital nomads. These types of entrepreneurs may not earn as much as other types of entrepreneurs, but they enjoy a high level of satisfaction and happiness from their work.


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2. Social Entrepreneurs

Social entrepreneurs are those who start a business to solve a social or environmental problem, rather than to make money. They use innovative and creative approaches to address issues such as poverty, education, health, climate change, or human rights. Social entrepreneurs aim to create positive social impact and change through their products, services, or business models.

Some examples of social entrepreneurs are Muhammad Yunus, the founder of Grameen Bank and the pioneer of microfinance; Blake Mycoskie, the founder of TOMS Shoes and the creator of the one-for-one model; and Malala Yousafzai, the co-founder of Malala Fund and the advocate for girls’ education. These types of entrepreneurs may not earn as much as other types of entrepreneurs, but they make a significant difference in the world.

3. Serial Entrepreneurs

Serial entrepreneurs are those who start multiple businesses over their lifetime, rather than sticking to one. They are always looking for new opportunities, challenges, and markets to explore. They are not afraid to take risks, fail, learn, and start over. Serial entrepreneurs have a high level of curiosity, creativity, and resilience.

Some examples of serial entrepreneurs are Richard Branson, the founder of Virgin Group and over 400 companies; Elon Musk, the founder of PayPal, SpaceX, Tesla, and Neuralink; and Oprah Winfrey, the founder of Harpo Productions, OWN Network, O Magazine, and Oprah.com. These types of entrepreneurs may earn a lot of money and fame from their ventures, but they also face a lot of stress and uncertainty.

4. Scalable Entrepreneurs

Scalable entrepreneurs are those who start a business with the intention of growing it rapidly and globally. They aim to create products or services that can reach millions or billions of customers and generate huge revenues and profits. Scalable entrepreneurs often leverage technology, innovation, and capital to achieve exponential growth and market domination.

Some examples of scalable entrepreneurs are Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook; Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon; and Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba. These types of entrepreneurs may earn a lot of money and power from their ventures, but they also face a lot of competition and regulation.

5. Opportunistic Entrepreneurs

Opportunistic entrepreneurs are those who start a business to take advantage of a gap or a trend in the market, rather than to pursue a personal passion or vision. They are quick to spot and seize opportunities that arise from changes in customer needs, preferences, or behaviors. They are adaptable, flexible, and pragmatic.

Some examples of opportunistic entrepreneurs are Brian Chesky, the founder of Airbnb; Travis Kalanick,
the founder of Uber; and Kevin Systrom, the founder of Instagram. These types of entrepreneurs may earn a lot of money and popularity from their ventures, but they also face a lot of uncertainty and disruption.

6. Necessity Entrepreneurs

Necessity entrepreneurs are those who start a business out of necessity, rather than of opportunity. They have no other choice but to become self-employed due to lack of employment options, income sources, or social support. They often face challenges such as low education, skills, or resources. Necessity entrepreneurs may not have a clear business plan, strategy, or vision.

Some examples of necessity entrepreneurs are street vendors, home-based workers, or informal sector workers in developing countries. These types of entrepreneurs may not earn much money or recognition from their ventures, but they provide for themselves and their families.

 


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7. Expert Entrepreneurs

Expert entrepreneurs are those who start a business based on their expertise, knowledge, or skills in a specific field or industry. They have a high level of competence, confidence, and credibility in their domain.
They often offer specialized products, services, or solutions that cater to a niche market or segment. Expert entrepreneurs may also leverage their reputation, network, or influence to attract customers, partners,
or investors.

Some examples of expert entrepreneurs are Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple; J.K. Rowling, the author of Harry Potter; and Tony Robbins, the motivational speaker and coach. These types of entrepreneurs may earn a lot of money and respect from their ventures, but they also face a lot of pressure and expectations.

As you can see, there are many types of entrepreneurs in the world, each with their own strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges. There is no one right or wrong way to be an entrepreneur. The type of entrepreneur you are or want to be depends on your goals, motivations, skills, and strategies. The important thing is to find the type of entrepreneurship that suits you best and pursue it with passion, purpose, and perseverance.

Types of Entrepreneurs and Their Global Demand

Entrepreneurs are people who start and run their own businesses, often with a passion for creating change in the world. There are many types of entrepreneurs, depending on their personality, skills, goals, and the kind of business they create. Some of the common types of entrepreneurs are:

– Innovative entrepreneurs: These are the ones who come up with new ideas or inventions that fill a need or improve quality of life. They often revolutionize entire industries with their products or services. Examples of innovative entrepreneurs are Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, and Mark Zuckerberg.
– Imitative entrepreneurs: These are the ones who take existing business ideas and improve or adjust them to suit different markets or customers. They don’t necessarily invent something new, but they make it better or easier to use. Examples of imitative entrepreneurs are Jeff Bezos, Jack Ma, and Sara Blakely.
– Social entrepreneurs: These are the ones who use their business skills to address social problems or create positive social impact. They often combine profit and purpose, and measure their success by both financial and social outcomes. Examples of social entrepreneurs are Muhammad Yunus, Blake Mycoskie, and Malala Yousafzai.

The global demand for different types of entrepreneurs varies depending on the economic development, cultural preferences, and consumer needs of different regions and countries. According to a report by Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), the total early-stage entrepreneurial activity (TEA) rate, which measures the percentage of adults who are starting or running a new business, was 13.3% in 2020, down from 17.4% in 2019 due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic . However, some regions and countries showed higher TEA rates than others, indicating a higher demand for entrepreneurship.

For example, Latin America and the Caribbean had the highest TEA rate of 19.4%, followed by Africa with 18.8%, and Asia-Pacific with 14.7%. These regions have a high demand for imitative entrepreneurs who can adapt existing business models to local markets and customers, as well as social entrepreneurs who can address social challenges such as poverty, inequality, and environmental issues . On the other hand, North America had the lowest TEA rate of 8.6%, followed by Europe with 9%. These regions have a high demand for innovative entrepreneurs who can create new products or services that can compete in global markets and offer unique value propositions .

The demand for different types of entrepreneurs is also influenced by factors such as education, infrastructure, access to finance, regulations, culture, and innovation. These factors can either support or hinder entrepreneurial activity in different contexts. For example, countries with higher levels of education, infrastructure, access to finance, and innovation tend to have more innovative entrepreneurs than countries with lower levels of these factors . Similarly, countries with more favorable regulations, culture, and social norms tend to have more social entrepreneurs than countries with less favorable conditions .

Therefore, it is important for aspiring entrepreneurs to understand the types of entrepreneurship that suit their personality, skills, goals, and the kind of business they want to create. It is also important for them to research the global demand for their type of entrepreneurship and the factors that affect it in different regions and countries. This way, they can increase their chances of success and create positive impact in the world.

References:

https://web.stanford.edu/~rkatila/new/pdf/KatilaSEJ12.pdf

http://www.inderscience.com/storage/f712106428511193.pdf

https://www.gemconsortium.org/report/gem-2020-2021-global-report
https://www.oecd.org/dev/americas/leo2019-en.htm
https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/entrecomp
https://www.doingbusiness.org/en/reports/global-reports/doing-business-2020
https://www.schwabfound.org/publications/social-innovation-a-guide-to-achieving-corporate-and-societal-value
https://www.forbes.com/sites/abdoriani/2017/10/17/the-4-types-of-entrepreneurs-and-which-one-you-should-be/?sh=6b0c2f1a5d9f
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/245667
https://www.inc.com/john-boitnott/the-7-types-of-entrepreneurs-which-one-are-you.html

 


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