Canadian Custom Tariff

Canadian Custom Tariff

How to Import Goods into Canada with the Canadian Customs Tariff

If you are planning to import goods into Canada, you need to be familiar with the Canadian Customs Tariff, which is an Act that classifies goods and determines the import duty or tariff of a particular item or product. In this article, we will explain what the Canadian Customs Tariff is, how it works, and how you can use it to calculate the import duty for your goods.

The Canadian Customs Tariff is based on the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS), which is an international standard for classifying goods in trade. The HS consists of 21 sections, 96 chapters, and thousands of subheadings that cover almost every product imaginable. Each product has a 10-digit HS code that identifies its section, chapter, heading, subheading, and tariff treatment.

The tariff treatment is the preferential rate of duty that applies to a product coming from a specific country or region. Canada has tariff arrangements with many countries and regions, such as the United States, Mexico, the European Union, and the Least Developed Countries. These arrangements are either free trade agreements (FTAs) or other preferential tariff programs that reduce or eliminate the import duty for eligible products.

How To Use The Canadian Customs Tariff?

To use the Canadian Customs Tariff to calculate the import duty for your goods, you need to follow these steps:

Identify the 10-digit HS code for your product. You can use the online search tool on the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) website, or consult a customs broker or a tariff classification expert.

Determine the origin of your product. The origin is the country or region where your product was wholly obtained or produced, or where it underwent its last substantial transformation. You may need to obtain a certificate of origin or other proof of origin to claim a preferential tariff treatment under an FTA or a preferential tariff program.

Find the applicable tariff treatment and rate of duty for your product. You can use the Customs Tariff files on the CBSA website, which show the tariff treatments and rates of duty for each HS code by chapter. You need to select the tariff treatment that corresponds to the origin of your product and apply the rate of duty to the value for duty of your product. The value for duty is the amount that you pay or will pay for your product in Canadian dollars, including any adjustments such as freight, insurance, commissions, royalties, etc.

Add any other taxes or fees that may apply to your product. Depending on the type and value of your product, you may also have to pay other taxes or fees, such as the goods and services tax (GST), provincial sales tax (PST), harmonized sales tax (HST), excise tax, anti-dumping duty, countervailing duty, etc.

By following these steps, you can estimate the import duty and other costs for your goods using the Canadian Customs Tariff. However, keep in mind that this is only an estimate and that the actual amount may vary depending on various factors such as exchange rates, currency conversion fees, customs valuation methods, etc. Therefore, it is advisable to consult a customs broker or a professional accountant before importing goods into Canada.


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The Impact of Canadian Custom Tariff on Global Demand

Canada is one of the world’s largest trading nations, with exports and imports accounting for about 64% of its gross domestic product (GDP) in 2020. Canada’s trade policy is shaped by various factors, such as its membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO), its free trade agreements (FTAs) with other countries, and its domestic tariff regime. The Canadian Customs Tariff is the official document that lists the rates of duty and tariff treatments for goods imported into Canada. It is based on the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS), which is an international standard for classifying products.

The Canadian Customs Tariff affects the global demand for Canadian products and services, as well as the demand for foreign products and services in Canada. The tariff can influence the price, quantity, quality, and variety of goods available in the market, as well as the competitiveness, profitability, and innovation of producers and consumers. The tariff can also have implications for the environment, social welfare, and national security.

The Effects of Tariff Reductions on Global Demand

Canada has been pursuing trade liberalization through multilateral, regional, and bilateral negotiations, resulting in tariff reductions for many products. According to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the average most-favoured-nation (MFN) tariff rate applied by Canada was 6.5% in 2020, down from 8.3% in 2010. The MFN tariff rate is the normal tariff rate that Canada applies to imports from countries with which it does not have a preferential trade agreement.

Tariff reductions can increase the global demand for Canadian products and services by making them more affordable and competitive in foreign markets. For example, a study by Statistics Canada found that a 10% reduction in tariffs increased Canadian exports by 3% on average between 1997 and 2014. Tariff reductions can also increase the demand for foreign products and services in Canada by lowering their prices and increasing their variety and quality. This can benefit Canadian consumers by giving them more choices and purchasing power, as well as Canadian producers who use imported inputs or intermediate goods in their production processes.


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The Effects of Tariff Differentials on Global Demand

Canada also applies preferential tariff rates to imports from countries with which it has a free trade agreement (FTA) or other special arrangements, such as the Least Developed Country Tariff (LDCT). These preferential tariff rates are lower than the MFN tariff rates, creating tariff differentials between different sources of imports. As of January 1, 2023, Canada has 15 FTAs in force with 51 countries, covering about 60% of its total merchandise trade.

Tariff differentials can affect the global demand for Canadian products and services by creating trade diversion or trade creation effects. Trade diversion occurs when a preferential tariff rate causes Canada to import more from an FTA partner country at the expense of a more efficient non-FTA country. This can reduce the overall welfare of Canada and the world by distorting the allocation of resources. Trade creation occurs when a preferential tariff rate causes Canada to import more from an FTA partner country without reducing its imports from non-FTA countries. This can increase the overall welfare of Canada and the world by expanding trade and production.

References:

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5056-eng.html#s5x4

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5056-eng.html#s5x1

https://www.cdnbeefcheckoff.ca/about-us/

https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/TSA%20FY18%20Budget.pdf

http://www.wcoomd.org/-/media/wco/public/global/pdf/topics/facilitation/instruments-and-tools/tools/safe-package/safe-framework-of-standards.pdf?la=en

https://web.archive.org/web/20090319202853/http://www.toll.no/upload/Dokumenter/brosjyrer_veiledere/Reisende_ENG.pdf

https://doi.org/10.26886%2F2524-101X.5.2018.2

https://en.abrams.wiki/blog/2020-01-17/How-to-find-new-customers-by-using-import-and-export-data?link_pos=selling-intelligence

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/

https://www.pcb.ca/post/canadian-customs-tariff-harmonized-system



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