how to find CFT of wood

how to find CFT of wood: 7 Steps to Calculate CFT

7 Steps to Calculate and  Find CFT of Wood for Your Project

If you are working on a woodworking project, you might need to know how to find CFT of wood. The cubic feet of wood is the measure of how much space a piece of wood occupies. Knowing the cubic feet of wood can help you estimate the cost, weight, and volume of your project.

In this article, we will show you how to find the cubic feet of wood in 7 easy steps. We will also explain what factors affect the cubic feet of wood, such as moisture content, species, and shape. By the end of this article, you will be able to calculate the cubic feet of wood for any piece of lumber or log.


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Step 1: Measure the Length, Width, and Thickness of the Wood

The first step to find the cubic feet of wood is to measure the length, width, and thickness of the wood. You can use a tape measure, a ruler, or a caliper to do this. Make sure you measure in inches, as this is the standard unit for lumber dimensions.

For example, let’s say you have a piece of lumber that is 8 feet long, 6 inches wide, and 2 inches thick. You would measure these dimensions in inches as follows:

Length = 8 feet x 12 inches = 96 inches
Width = 6 inches
Thickness = 2 inches

Step 2: Convert the Dimensions to Feet for find CFT of wood

The next step is to convert the dimensions from inches to feet. To do this, you simply divide each dimension by 12, since there are 12 inches in a foot.

For example, using the same piece of lumber from step 1, you would convert the dimensions to feet as follows:

Length = 96 inches / 12 = 8 feet
Width = 6 inches / 12 = 0.5 feet
Thickness = 2 inches / 12 = 0.167 feet

Step 3: Multiply the Dimensions to Find the Cubic Feet

The third step is to multiply the dimensions in feet to find CFT of wood. The formula for finding the cubic feet of wood is:

Cubic Feet = Length x Width x Thickness

For example, using the same piece of lumber from step 2, you would multiply the dimensions in feet to find the cubic feet as follows:

Cubic Feet = 8 x 0.5 x 0.167
Cubic Feet = 0.667

Therefore, the cubic feet of wood for this piece of lumber is 0.667.

Step 4: Repeat Steps 1-3 for Each Piece of Wood

If you have more than one piece of wood for your project, you need to repeat steps 1-3 for each piece of wood. Then, you need to add up all the cubic feet values to get the total cubic feet of wood for your project.

For example, let’s say you have three pieces of lumber for your project:

Piece A: Length = 8 feet, Width = 6 inches, Thickness = 2 inches
Piece B: Length = 6 feet, Width = 4 inches, Thickness = 1 inch
Piece C: Length = 4 feet, Width = 3 inches, Thickness = 0.5 inch

You would find the cubic feet of wood for each piece as follows:

Piece A: Cubic Feet = (8 x 12) / 12 x (6 / 12) x (2 / 12) = 0.667
Piece B: Cubic Feet = (6 x 12) / 12 x (4 / 12) x (1 / 12) = 0.167
Piece C: Cubic Feet = (4 x 12) / 12 x (3 / 12) x (0.5 / 12) = 0.042

Then, you would add up all the cubic feet values to get the total cubic feet of wood for your project:

Total Cubic Feet = Piece A + Piece B + Piece C
Total Cubic Feet = 0.667 + 0.167 + 0.042
Total Cubic Feet = 0.876

Therefore, the total cubic feet of wood for your project is 0.876.


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Step 5: Consider the Moisture Content of the Wood

for find CFT of wood, The moisture content of the wood is another factor that affects the cubic feet of wood. The moisture content is the amount of water in the wood expressed as a percentage of its dry weight.

Wood with higher moisture content will have more volume than wood with lower moisture content. This is because water expands when it freezes and contracts when it evaporates.

Therefore, if you want to find the true cubic feet of wood for your project, you need to consider the moisture content of the wood and adjust accordingly.

The moisture content of wood can vary depending on the type of wood, the source of the wood, the storage conditions, and the climate. You can use a moisture meter to measure the moisture content of the wood, or you can use a table that shows the average moisture content of different wood species.

For example, let’s say you have a piece of pine wood that has a moisture content of 15%. According to a table, the average moisture content of pine wood is 12%. This means that your piece of pine wood has more volume than the average piece of pine wood.

To find the true cubic feet of wood for your piece of pine wood, you need to divide the cubic feet value by the ratio of the moisture content to the average moisture content. The formula for finding the true cubic feet of wood is:

True Cubic Feet = Cubic Feet / (Moisture Content / Average Moisture Content)

For example, using the same piece of pine wood from step 3, you would find the true cubic feet of wood as follows:

True Cubic Feet = 0.667 / (15 / 12)
True Cubic Feet = 0.667 / 1.25
True Cubic Feet = 0.534

Therefore, the true cubic feet of wood for this piece of pine wood is 0.534.

Step 6: Consider the Shape of the Wood

The shape of the wood is another factor that affects the cubic feet of wood. The shape of the wood determines how much space it occupies and how much waste it produces.

The most common shapes of wood are rectangular, cylindrical, and irregular. Each shape has a different formula for finding the cubic feet of wood.

For rectangular wood, such as lumber or boards, you can use the formula from step 3:

Cubic Feet = Length x Width x Thickness

For cylindrical wood, such as logs or poles, you can use the formula:

Cubic Feet = Pi x Radius Squared x Length

For irregular wood, such as branches or roots, you can use the formula:

Cubic Feet = Volume / 1728

Where volume is the amount of water displaced by the wood when submerged in a container.

For example, let’s say you have a cylindrical log that is 10 feet long and has a diameter of 1 foot. You would find the cubic feet of wood for this log as follows:

Cubic Feet = Pi x Radius Squared x Length
Cubic Feet = 3.14 x (0.5 x 0.5) x 10
Cubic Feet = 3.14 x 0.25 x 10
Cubic Feet = 7.85

Therefore, the cubic feet of wood for this log is 7.85.

Step 7: Compare Your Results with Other Methods

The final step to find the cubic feet of wood is to compare your results with other methods. There are other ways to estimate or measure the cubic feet of wood, such as using a scale, a cord, or a board foot.

A scale is a device that measures the weight of an object. You can use a scale to weigh your wood and then use a conversion factor to find the cubic feet of wood. The conversion factor depends on the type and density of the wood.

A cord is a unit of measure for firewood. It is defined as a stack of wood that is 4 feet high, 4 feet wide, and 8 feet long. A cord contains about 128 cubic feet of stacked wood, but only about 80 cubic feet of solid wood.

A board foot is a unit of measure for lumber. It is defined as a piece of wood that is 1 inch thick, 12 inches wide, and 12 inches long. A board foot contains about 0.083 cubic feet of solid wood.

You can use these methods to check your calculations or to estimate to find CFT of wood without measuring.

For example, using the same piece of lumber from step 1, you would find the cubic feet of wood using these methods as follows:

Scale: Weight = 10 pounds
Conversion Factor = 0.07 (for pine)
Cubic Feet = Weight x Conversion Factor
Cubic Feet = 10 x 0.07
Cubic Feet = 0.7

Cord: Volume = (8 x 12) / (4 x 4 x 8) x 128
Volume = (96 / 128) x 128
Volume = 96
Solid Wood = Volume x (80 / 128)
Solid Wood = 96 x (80 / 128)
Solid Wood = 60
Cubic Feet = Solid Wood / Number of Pieces
Cubic Feet = 60 / (8 x (6 /12) x (2 /12))
Cubic Feet = 60 / (8 x (1/2) x (1/6))
Cubic Feet = 60 / (2/3)
Cubic Feet = 90

 

The final step is to check your results and make sure they are reasonable and accurate. You can do this by comparing your results with other sources, such as online calculators, tools, or tables, or by asking an expert or a professional for advice.

You can also check your results by using the inverse method, which is to divide the cubic feet of wood by the MCF and then by the SF, and then divide the result by the length, width, and thickness in feet. This should give you back the original measurements in inches that you started with.

For example, if you have 3.87 cubic feet of green oak wood, you would divide it by 1.5 and then by 1.2 to get 2.15 cubic feet. Then you would divide it by 8 feet, 0.83 feet, and 0.17 feet to get 96 inches, 10 inches, and 2 inches respectively.

If your results are not reasonable or accurate, you may need to check your calculations, measurements, or factors for errors or mistakes. You may also need to adjust your factors for different conditions, such as temperature, humidity, or altitude.

 

 find CFT of wood for your project is not difficult if you follow these 7 steps:

1. Measure the length, width, and thickness of the wood in inches.
2. Convert the measurements to feet.
3. Multiply the measurements to find the volume in cubic feet.
4. Repeat for each piece of wood.
5. Add up all the volumes.
6. Adjust for moisture content and species.
7. Check your results.

By following these steps, you will be able to find the cubic feet of wood for any project with confidence and accuracy. You will also be able to estimate the cost, weight, and strength of your project.

We hope this article was helpful and informative for you. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us or leave a comment below.

References:

https://www.wagnermeters.com/moisture-meters/wood-info/how-to-calculate-the-cubic-feet-of-wood/
https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr190/chapter_12.pdf
– https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wood-density-d_40.html
– https://www.calculator.net/volume-calculator.html
– https://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/construction/lumber.php

 

 

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