Import Meat To USA

Import Meat To USA

How to Import Meat to USA: A Complete Guide for Businesses

If you are a business owner who wants to import meat to USA, you might be wondering what are the steps, requirements, and costs involved. In this article, we will provide you with a comprehensive overview of the process, from obtaining the necessary permits and certificates, to complying with the food safety and labeling regulations, to clearing the customs and paying the duties and fees.

Importing meat to USA is not a simple task, as it involves multiple agencies and authorities, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Each of these agencies has its own rules and procedures that you need to follow in order to import meat legally and safely.

Here are the main steps that you need to take to import meat to USA:

1. Determine the eligibility of your product

Not all types of meat are allowed to enter the U.S. market, depending on the country of origin, the animal species, and the processing method. You can check the eligibility of your product on the USDA website, where you can find a list of countries and products that are approved for importation. You can also contact the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) office in your country for more information.


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2. Obtain an import permit from USDA

If your product is eligible, you need to apply for an import permit from USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). This permit will specify the quantity, origin, destination, and purpose of your shipment, as well as any additional requirements or restrictions that may apply. You can apply for an import permit online through the APHIS ePermits system, or by mail or fax.

3. Obtain a health certificate from the competent authority in your country

You also need to obtain a health certificate from the veterinary authority in your country of origin, certifying that your product meets the U.S. animal health requirements. The health certificate must include information such as the product name, description, quantity, origin, processing method, date of slaughter or production, and identification marks. The health certificate must also be endorsed by an APHIS-approved veterinarian in your country.

4. Comply with the food safety and labeling regulations

Before you ship your product to USA, you need to ensure that it complies with the food safety and labeling regulations enforced by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and FDA. These regulations cover aspects such as sanitation, inspection, testing, packaging, labeling, and traceability of your product. You can find more information on the FSIS website and the FDA website.

5. Arrange for pre-shipment inspection and approval by USDA

Depending on the type and origin of your product, you may need to arrange for a pre-shipment inspection and approval by USDA before you export it to USA. This inspection will verify that your product meets the U.S. requirements and is free of any diseases or contaminants. You can contact the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) office in your country for more information on how to request a pre-shipment inspection.

6. Ship your product to USA with proper documentation

Once you have obtained all the necessary permits, certificates, and approvals, you can ship your product to USA with proper documentation. You need to include copies of your import permit, health certificate, pre-shipment inspection report, invoice, packing list, bill of lading, and any other relevant documents with your shipment. You also need to mark your product with a unique identification number that matches the one on your import permit.

7. Clear customs and pay duties and fees at the port of entry

When your product arrives at the U.S. port of entry, you need to clear customs and pay any applicable duties and fees. You need to declare your product to CBP and present all the required documents for inspection. CBP will verify that your product is eligible for entry and complies with all the U.S. regulations. CBP may also collect samples of your product for further testing or examination by USDA or FDA.

8. Distribute or sell your product in USA according to local laws

After you have cleared customs and paid all the duties and fees, you can distribute or sell your product in USA according to local laws. You need to follow any state or local regulations that may apply to your product, such as licensing, registration, taxation, or labeling requirements. You also need to maintain records of your product’s origin, destination, quantity, date of entry, and any other relevant information for traceability purposes.

Importing meat to USA can be a profitable business opportunity if you follow these steps carefully and comply with all the U.S. regulations. However, it can also be a challenging and costly process that requires a lot of planning, preparation, and paperwork. Therefore, it is advisable to consult with a professional import agent or broker who can help you navigate the complex and dynamic U.S. import system and avoid any potential pitfalls or delays.


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How the U.S. Meat Import Industry Is Changing

The U.S. is one of the largest consumers and producers of meat in the world, but it also relies on imports from other countries to meet its domestic demand. In this blog post, we will look at some of the trends and statistics of the U.S. meat import industry, focusing on beef and pork, the two most imported types of meat.

Beef Imports: Canada and Mexico Lead the Way

According to the USDA, the U.S. imported about 2.9 billion pounds of beef in 2022, a slight decrease from the previous year. The top five sources of beef imports were Canada (29%), Mexico (20%), Australia (18%), New Zealand (12%), and Brazil (7%). These five countries accounted for 86% of total U.S. beef imports in 2022.

The U.S. imports beef from different countries for various reasons, such as price, quality, seasonality, and trade agreements. For example, Canada and Mexico are the main suppliers of fresh and chilled beef, which are preferred by U.S. consumers and retailers. Australia and New Zealand are the main suppliers of frozen beef, which are used for processing and food service. Brazil is a relatively new entrant to the U.S. beef market, after gaining access in 2016 following a 13-year ban due to concerns over foot-and-mouth disease.

Pork Imports: The Rise of China

The U.S. imported about 1 billion pounds of pork in 2022, an increase of 25% from the previous year. The top five sources of pork imports were Canada (51%), Mexico (15%), China (11%), Poland (7%), and Denmark (5%). These five countries accounted for 89% of total U.S. pork imports in 2022.

The U.S. imports pork from different countries for various reasons, such as price, quality, variety, and trade agreements. For example, Canada is the main supplier of fresh and chilled pork, which are preferred by U.S. consumers and retailers. Mexico is the main supplier of cooked ham and shoulders, which are used for processing and food service. China is a relatively new entrant to the U.S. pork market, after gaining access in 2019 following a 5-year ban due to concerns over African swine fever.

The U.S. pork import industry has been affected by several factors in recent years, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the African swine fever outbreak in China, and the trade tensions between the U.S. and China. These factors have led to fluctuations in supply and demand, as well as changes in prices and trade flows.

The U.S. meat import industry is dynamic and complex, reflecting the diverse preferences and needs of U.S. consumers and producers. The U.S. imports meat from different countries for various reasons, such as price, quality, seasonality, and trade agreements. The U.S. meat import industry is also influenced by several factors, such as animal health issues, trade disputes, and global market conditions.

The U.S. meat import industry is expected to continue to evolve in the future, as new opportunities and challenges arise in the global meat market.

References:

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/2020pr/ft900_2012.pdf

https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-trade-deficit-likely-widened-in-april-amid-coronavirus-disruptions-11591268401

https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/livestock-and-meat-international-trade-data
https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2012/september/how-much-us-meat/
https://www.statista.com/statistics/809816/share-of-beef-import-volume-to-us-by-country-of-origin/
https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/ag-and-food-statistics-charting-the-essentials/agricultural-trade/

https://www.usda.gov/

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/home/

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/

https://www.fda.gov/



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