International Tariff, 7 Reasons Why It's Matter for Your Business

International Tariff, 7 Reasons Why It’s Matter for Your Business

7 Reasons Why International Tariffs Matter for Your Business

International tariffs are taxes imposed by governments on imported goods and services. They are a common tool of trade policy, and they have a significant impact on the global economy and the businesses that operate within it. Here are seven reasons why international tariffs matter for your business and how you can adapt to them.

1. International tariffs affect the prices of goods and services

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported product, it increases the cost of that product for the domestic consumers and businesses that buy it. This can reduce the demand for the imported product and increase the demand for domestic substitutes, if any. Alternatively, the importer may absorb some or all of the tariff cost and reduce its profit margin, or pass it on to the foreign exporter and reduce its competitiveness.


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2. International tariffs affect the supply of goods and services

When a country imposes a tariff on an exported product, it decreases the revenue of that product for the foreign consumers and businesses that buy it. This can reduce the supply of the exported product and increase the supply of domestic substitutes, if any. Alternatively, the exporter may absorb some or all of the tariff cost and reduce its profit margin, or pass it on to the domestic importer and reduce its competitiveness.

3. International tariffs affect the trade balance and exchange rates

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported product, it reduces its imports and increases its exports, improving its trade balance. This can increase the demand for its currency and appreciate its exchange rate, making its exports more expensive and its imports cheaper. Conversely, when a country imposes a tariff on an exported product, it reduces its exports and increases its imports, worsening its trade balance. This can decrease the demand for its currency and depreciate its exchange rate, making its exports cheaper and its imports more expensive.

4. International tariffs affect the economic growth and welfare

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported or exported product, it creates a deadweight loss, which is the reduction in economic surplus for both producers and consumers. This means that the tariff reduces the overall efficiency and welfare of the economy, as some resources are wasted or misallocated. The magnitude of the deadweight loss depends on the elasticity of demand and supply for the product, as well as the size of the tariff.

5. International tariffs affect the income distribution and inequality

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported or exported product, it redistributes income from one group to another. For example, a tariff on an imported product benefits the domestic producers of that product, who can charge higher prices and earn higher profits, but harms the domestic consumers of that product, who have to pay higher prices and consume less. Similarly, a tariff on an exported product benefits the foreign consumers of that product, who can pay lower prices and consume more, but harms the domestic exporters of that product, who have to charge lower prices and earn lower profits. The net effect of a tariff on income distribution and inequality depends on who gains more and who loses more from the tariff.

6. International tariffs affect the political relations and stability

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported or exported product, it affects not only its economic interests but also its political interests. A tariff can be seen as a signal of protectionism, nationalism, or aggression by the imposing country, which can provoke retaliation or resentment from the affected countries. A tariff can also be seen as a bargaining chip or a concession by the imposing country, which can facilitate cooperation or compromise from the affected countries. The impact of a tariff on political relations and stability depends on how it is perceived and responded to by both parties.

7. International tariffs affect the environmental sustainability

When a country imposes a tariff on an imported or exported product, it affects not only its economic activity but also its environmental activity. A tariff can have positive or negative effects on the environment, depending on the nature of the product and the market conditions. For example, a tariff on an imported product that is environmentally harmful can reduce its consumption and production, lowering its environmental impact. However, a tariff on an exported product that is environmentally beneficial can reduce its consumption and production, raising its environmental impact.

As you can see, international tariffs are complex and multifaceted phenomena that have far-reaching consequences for your business and beyond. To cope with them effectively, you need to understand their causes, effects, and implications, as well as their potential opportunities and challenges. You also need to monitor their changes and trends, as well as their responses and reactions from other countries. By doing so, you can make informed decisions and strategies that will help you succeed in the global market.


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The Impact of International Tariffs on Global Demand

International tariffs are taxes imposed by governments on imports or exports of goods and services. They are usually used to protect domestic industries, raise revenue, or achieve political objectives. However, tariffs also have significant effects on global demand, which is the amount of goods and services that consumers and businesses are willing and able to buy at different prices.

How Tariffs Affect Demand for Imported Goods

Tariffs increase the price of imported goods, making them less competitive and attractive to domestic consumers. This reduces the quantity demanded of imported goods, as shown by the downward movement along the demand curve in Figure 1. The reduction in demand for imported goods also implies a reduction in demand for foreign currency, which can affect the exchange rate and the balance of payments.

How Tariffs Affect Demand for Domestic Goods

Tariffs can also affect the demand for domestic goods, depending on the degree of substitution and complementarity between domestic and imported goods. If domestic and imported goods are close substitutes, such as cars or clothes, then a tariff on imports will increase the demand for domestic goods, as consumers switch from more expensive imports to cheaper domestic alternatives. This is shown by the rightward shift of the demand curve in Figure 2. The increase in demand for domestic goods can stimulate domestic production, employment, and income.

However, if domestic and imported goods are complements, such as computers and software, then a tariff on imports will decrease the demand for domestic goods, as consumers buy less of both goods due to the higher price of imports. This is shown by the leftward shift of the demand curve in Figure 3. The decrease in demand for domestic goods can reduce domestic production, employment, and income.

How Tariffs Affect Global Demand

The overall effect of tariffs on global demand depends on the net impact of tariffs on demand for imported and domestic goods in each country. In general, tariffs tend to reduce global demand by creating inefficiencies and distortions in international trade. According to the World Trade Organization (WTO), the average applied tariff rate in 2020 was 7.5%, which implies a significant loss of consumer surplus and welfare for both importing and exporting countries. Moreover, tariffs can trigger trade wars and retaliation, which can further reduce global demand and growth.

References:

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/6958854.pdf

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/6958854.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20120915114121/http://siteresources.worldbank.org/AFRICAEXT/Resources/AFR_Growth_Advance_Edition.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20210308192131/https://www.cepal.org/prensa/noticias/comunicados/8/7598/chang.pdf

http://drodrik.scholar.harvard.edu/files/dani-rodrik/files/after-neoliberalism-what.pdf

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/tariff.asp

http://fordschool.umich.edu/rsie/workingpapers/Papers476-500/r489.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20210308192131/https://www.cepal.org/prensa/noticias/comunicados/8/7598/chang.pdf

https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/2209/trade/the-effect-of-tariffs-on-the-economy/

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-44529600



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Essential Topics You Should Be Familiar With:

  1. custom tariff
  2. trade tariff
  3. import tariff
  4. export tariff
  5. cbsa tariff
  6. tariff duty
  7. safeguard tariff
  8. international tarrif
  9. ad valorem tariff
  10. us customs tariff