types of manager in business,7 Types of Managers in Business

types of manager in business

7 Types of Managers in Business: How to Identify and Work with Them

If you work in a business, chances are you have encountered different types of managers. Some are supportive and inspiring, while others are micromanaging and demanding. Knowing the types of managers in business can help you understand their motivations, expectations, and communication styles. In this article, we will explore seven common types of managers in business and how to work with them effectively.

1. The Visionary Manager

The visionary manager is someone who has a clear and compelling vision for the future of the business. They are often charismatic and persuasive, and they inspire their team to follow their lead. The visionary manager is good at setting goals, creating strategies, and motivating others. However, they may also be unrealistic, impatient, or detached from the details.

How to work with them: To work well with a visionary manager, you need to share their enthusiasm and align your actions with their vision. You also need to be proactive and independent, as they may not provide much guidance or feedback. You can impress them by showing initiative, creativity, and results.

 


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2. The Autocratic Manager

The autocratic manager is someone who likes to have total control over everything. They are often strict and demanding, and they expect their team to follow their orders without question. The autocratic manager is good at making decisions, enforcing rules, and maintaining order. However, they may also be rigid, domineering, or insensitive.

How to work with them: To work well with an autocratic manager, you need to respect their authority and comply with their instructions. You also need to be punctual, reliable, and accurate, as they may not tolerate mistakes or delays. You can impress them by showing loyalty, discipline, and efficiency.

3. The Democratic Manager

The democratic manager is someone who values collaboration and participation. They are often friendly and approachable, and they encourage their team to share their opinions and ideas. The democratic manager is good at listening, communicating, and building consensus. However, they may also be indecisive, inconsistent, or too lenient.

How to work with them: To work well with a democratic manager, you need to be cooperative and respectful. You also need to be willing to contribute, as they may expect you to participate in discussions and decisions. You can impress them by showing teamwork, initiative, and diversity.

4. The Coaching Manager

The coaching manager is someone who focuses on developing and empowering their team. They are often supportive and inspiring, and they provide their team with feedback and guidance. The coaching manager is good at teaching, mentoring, and motivating others. However, they may also be too involved, unrealistic, or demanding.

How to work with them: To work well with a coaching manager, you need to be open-minded and eager to learn. You also need to be receptive to feedback, as they may challenge you to improve your skills and performance. You can impress them by showing growth, potential, and enthusiasm.

5. The Laissez-Faire Manager

The laissez-faire manager is someone who gives their team a lot of freedom and autonomy. They are often flexible and relaxed, and they trust their team to do their work without much supervision or interference. The laissez-faire manager is good at delegating, empowering, and respecting others. However, they may also be too hands-off, uninvolved, or irresponsible.

How to work with them: To work well with a laissez-faire manager, you need to be self-motivated and responsible. You also need to be able to manage your own time, resources,
and goals without much guidance or support. You can impress them by showing independence,
productivity,
and accountability.

6. The Pacesetting Manager

The pacesetting manager is someone who sets high standards for themselves and their team.
They are often driven
and ambitious,
and they expect their team
to perform at their level.
The pacesetting manager is good at achieving results,
leading by example,
and challenging others.
However,
they may also be too demanding,
competitive,
or impatient.

How to work with them:
To work well with a pacesetting manager,
you need to be competent
and confident.
You also need to be able
to keep up with their pace,
as they may not slow down
or offer much help.
You can impress them by showing excellence,
speed,
and initiative.

7.The Affiliative Manager

The affiliative manager is someone who cares about the emotional well-being of their team.
They are often warm
and empathetic,
and they create a positive
and harmonious work environment.
The affiliative manager is good at building relationships,
resolving conflicts,
and boosting morale.
However,
they may also be too emotional,
dependent,
or avoidant.

How to work with them:
To work well with an affiliative manager,
you need to be friendly
and supportive.
You also need to be able
to express your feelings,
as they may value emotional intelligence
over technical skills.
You can impress them by showing compassion,
loyalty,
and harmony.

Knowing the types of managers in business can help you adapt your communication
and work style to suit their preferences
and expectations.
By understanding their strengths
and weaknesses,
you can also learn from them
and improve your own management skills.

 


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Types of Managers in Business: A Global Perspective

The role of managers in business is crucial for achieving the goals and objectives of an organization. Managers are responsible for planning, organizing, leading, and controlling the resources and processes of a business. However, not all managers are the same. There are different types of managers in business, depending on their level, function, and role in the organization. In this blog post, we will explore the four most common types of managers and how they differ across the world.

Top-Level Managers: The Visionaries

Top-level managers are the highest-ranking managers in a business. They have titles such as chief executive officer (CEO), chief operations officer (COO), chief marketing officer (CMO), chief technology officer (CTO), and chief financial officer (CFO). They are responsible for developing the strategy and vision of the business, setting long-term goals, and overseeing the overall performance of the organization. They also represent the business to external stakeholders, such as investors, customers, suppliers, regulators, and the media.

Top-level managers are often influenced by the culture and context of their country or region. For example, according to a study by Hofstede Insights, top-level managers in individualistic cultures, such as the United States, Canada, and Australia, tend to be more autonomous, assertive, and competitive than top-level managers in collectivistic cultures, such as China, Japan, and India, who tend to be more cooperative, harmonious, and loyal to their group. Similarly, top-level managers in high-power distance cultures, such as Mexico, Brazil, and Russia, tend to be more authoritative, hierarchical, and formal than top-level managers in low-power distance cultures, such as Denmark, Sweden, and Norway, who tend to be more participative, egalitarian, and informal.

Functional Managers: The Specialists

Functional managers are responsible for a specific function or department within a business, such as marketing, accounting, human resources, production, or research and development. They have titles such as marketing manager, finance manager, human resources manager, or operations manager. They are responsible for managing the daily activities of their function or department, setting short-term goals and objectives, allocating resources and budgets, supervising employees and teams, and ensuring quality and efficiency.

Functional managers are often influenced by the nature and complexity of their function or department. For example, according to a study by McKinsey & Company,
functional managers in dynamic functions or departments that require constant innovation and adaptation to changing market conditions,
such as marketing or research and development,
tend to be more creative,
flexible,
and risk-taking
than functional managers in stable functions or departments that require consistent execution and optimization of established processes,
such as accounting or production,
who tend to be more analytical,
structured,
and risk-averse.

First-Line Managers: The Supervisors

First-line managers are responsible for supervising the employees who perform the daily tasks of the business. They have titles such as supervisor,
team leader,
or foreman.
They are responsible for assigning work,
monitoring performance,
providing feedback,
solving problems,
and motivating employees.
They also act as a link between the employees and the higher-level managers.

First-line managers are often influenced by the skills
and attitudes
of their employees.
For example,
according to a study by Gallup,
first-line managers in high-engagement workplaces
that have employees who are committed
and enthusiastic
about their work
tend to be more supportive,
empowering,
and coaching
than first-line managers in low-engagement workplaces
that have employees who are disengaged
and dissatisfied
with their work
who tend to be more directive,
controlling,
and micromanaging.

Team Leaders: The Coordinators

Team leaders are responsible for coordinating the work of a group of employees who share a common goal. They have titles such as project manager,
product manager,
or account manager.
They are responsible for planning projects,
setting deadlines,
communicating expectations,
resolving conflicts,
and facilitating collaboration.
They also act as a representative of their team to other teams or stakeholders.

Team leaders are often influenced by the diversity
and dynamics
of their team.
For example,
according to a study by Harvard Business Review,
team leaders in diverse teams
that have members from different backgrounds
and perspectives
tend to be more inclusive,
open-minded,
and culturally sensitive
than team leaders in homogeneous teams
that have members from similar backgrounds
and perspectives
who tend to be more exclusive,
biased,
and culturally insensitive.
Similarly,
team leaders in high-performance teams
that have members who are aligned
and accountable
to their goal
tend to be more visionary,
strategic,
and results-oriented
than team leaders in low-performance teams
that have members who are misaligned
and unaccountable
to their goal
who tend to be more operational,
tactical,
and process-oriented.

As we have seen,
there are different types of managers in business,
depending on their level,
function,
and role in the organization.
These types of managers also differ across the world,
depending on the culture and context of their country or region,
the nature and complexity of their function or department,
the skills and attitudes of their employees,
and the diversity and dynamics of their team.
Understanding these differences can help managers to adapt their style and approach to different situations and challenges,
and to leverage the strengths and opportunities of their position and environment.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_manager#:~:text=Sports%20Business%20Journal.%20%22Athlete%20advisors%20Klarberg%2C%20Furst%20Close%20to%20Deal%22%2C%20April%209%2C%202012.

https://archive.org/details/hiddenscreenlowp0000hill

https://oed.com/search?searchType=dictionary&q=business+manager

Hofstede Insights. (n.d.). Country comparison. Retrieved from https://www.hofstede-insights.com/country-comparison/

McKinsey & Company. (2018). The mindsets and practices of excellent CEOs. Retrieved from https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/the-mindsets-and-practices-of-excellent-ceos

Gallup. (2015). State of the American manager: Analytics and advice for leaders. Retrieved from https://www.gallup.com/services/182138/state-american-manager.aspx

Harvard Business Review. (2016). Why diverse teams are smarter. Retrieved from

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2018/04/03/the-seven-types-of-managers-you-need-to-know/?sh=5f0e9c0a6f7a

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/types-of-management-styles

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_84.htm


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