Import Butter, 7 Reasons To Import It From New Zealand

Import Butter, 7 Reasons To Import It From New Zealand

7 Reasons Why You Should Import Butter From New Zealand

Butter is one of the most versatile and delicious ingredients in the world. It can enhance the flavor and texture of any dish, from baked goods to sauces to soups. But not all butter is created equal. Some butter is made from cows that are fed with hormones, antibiotics, or GMOs, which can affect the quality and taste of the butter. Other butter is produced in countries that have low standards of hygiene, animal welfare, or environmental protection, which can pose health and ethical risks for consumers.

That’s why you should consider importing butter from New Zealand, a country that is known for its high-quality dairy products and its natural and sustainable farming practices. Here are seven reasons why New Zealand butter is superior to other butter and why you should import it for your personal or business use.

1. New Zealand butter is made from grass-fed cows

Unlike many other countries, where cows are confined in feedlots and fed with grains or soy, New Zealand cows are free to roam and graze on lush green pastures all year round. This means that their milk and butter have a higher content of omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), vitamin A, vitamin E, and beta-carotene, which are beneficial for your health and immune system.


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2. New Zealand butter is hormone-free and antibiotic-free

New Zealand has strict regulations that prohibit the use of artificial growth hormones (rBGH) or antibiotics in dairy farming. This means that New Zealand butter is free of any residues or traces of these substances, which can cause hormonal imbalances, allergies, or antibiotic resistance in humans.

3. New Zealand butter is GMO-free

New Zealand has a moratorium on the commercial release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and does not allow the importation of GMO feed for animals. This means that New Zealand butter is free of any genetic modifications that can alter the natural characteristics or nutritional value of the butter.

4. New Zealand butter is environmentally friendly

New Zealand has a reputation for being one of the most pristine and beautiful countries in the world, with a low population density and a high level of biodiversity. New Zealand dairy farmers are committed to preserving the natural environment and minimizing their environmental impact by using sustainable farming practices, such as rotational grazing, water conservation, soil management, and waste reduction.

5. New Zealand butter is ethically produced

New Zealand has high standards of animal welfare and humane treatment of animals. New Zealand dairy cows are treated with respect and care, and are not subjected to any cruel or unnecessary practices, such as tail docking, dehorning, or calving induction. New Zealand dairy farmers also adhere to the Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare, which are: freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort; freedom from pain, injury, or disease; freedom to express normal behavior; and freedom from fear and distress.

6. New Zealand butter is delicious

New Zealand butter has a rich, creamy, and smooth texture that melts in your mouth. It has a natural golden color that reflects the high content of beta-carotene from the grass-fed cows. It has a subtle and delicate flavor that complements any dish without overpowering it. Whether you use it for baking, cooking, or spreading on toast, you will enjoy the taste and quality of New Zealand butter.

7. New Zealand butter is easy to import

Thanks to the internet and global trade, importing butter from New Zealand is easier than ever before. You can find online platforms that connect you with reliable and reputable suppliers of New Zealand butter who can ship it to your doorstep in a timely and cost-effective manner. You can also choose from different varieties and brands of New Zealand butter that suit your preferences and needs.

If you are looking for a high-quality, natural, healthy, ethical, and tasty butter, you should import butter from New Zealand. You will not regret it.


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The Global Demand for Butter: Trends and Statistics

Butter is one of the most widely consumed dairy products in the world, with a global production of about 11 million metric tons in 2020. However, the demand for butter varies across regions and countries, depending on factors such as income, preferences, culture, health awareness and trade policies. In this blog post, we will look at some of the trends and statistics of butter imports in three major markets: the United States, France and China.

The United States: A Growing Importer of Butter

The United States is the second-largest producer of butter in the world, after India, with a production of about 1.8 million metric tons in 2020. However, the domestic consumption of butter has been increasing faster than the production, leading to a growing gap between supply and demand. According to Statista , the trade volume of butter imported to the United States increased from 12 thousand metric tons in 2013 to 81 thousand metric tons in 2022, an increase of almost 70 thousand metric tons in less than a decade. The main sources of butter imports for the United States are New Zealand, Ireland, Mexico and Canada, which together account for more than 90% of the total imports .

France: A Stable Importer of Butter

France is the fourth-largest producer of butter in the world, after India, the United States and Germany, with a production of about 1.6 million metric tons in 2020. France is also a major consumer and exporter of butter, especially to other European countries. However, France also imports butter from other countries to meet its domestic demand and to diversify its sources of supply. According to Statista , the total import volume of butter from France increased from 140.7 thousand metric tons in 2008 to around 204 thousand metric tons in 2020, an increase of about 63 thousand metric tons in 12 years. The main sources of butter imports for France are Belgium, Germany, Ireland and Denmark, which together account for more than 80% of the total imports.

China: A Rapid Importer of Butter

China is not a traditional consumer of butter, as dairy products are not part of its typical diet. However, in recent years, China has been experiencing a surge in demand for butter, driven by factors such as urbanization, income growth, westernization of food habits and e-commerce. China is also a net importer of butter, as its domestic production is far below its consumption. According to Statista , the volume of butter imported to China increased from 22 thousand metric tons in 2013 to around 143 thousand metric tons in 2022, an increase of more than 120 thousand metric tons in less than a decade. The main sources of butter imports for China are New Zealand, Australia, France and Ireland, which together account for more than 90% of the total imports.

Butter is a global commodity that reflects the diversity and dynamism of consumer preferences and market conditions. The demand for butter is influenced by various factors such as income, culture, health awareness and trade policies. The trends and statistics of butter imports show that different countries have different patterns and sources of supply, depending on their domestic production and consumption levels. As the global demand for butter continues to grow, it will be interesting to see how the trade flows and market structures evolve in the future.

References:

https://web.archive.org/web/20061006150533/http://drinc.ucdavis.edu/research/butter.pdf

http://www.webexhibits.org/butter/ref/MiltonEParker.pdf

https://doi.org/10.1038%2F157232a0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Frederick_Hunziker

https://www.statista.com/statistics/195810/us-butter-imports-by-leading-countries-of-origin/
https://www.fas.usda.gov/data/dairy-monthly-imports
https://www.statista.com/statistics/454429/total-import-butter-import-volume-france/
https://www.statista.com/statistics/1048680/china-butter-imports-by-leading-exporter/

https://www.nzstory.govt.nz/stories/the-new-zealand-grass-fed-butter-advantage/

https://www.dairynz.co.nz/animal/animal-welfare/



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